Our Local Fish

When it comes to looking for places with the opportunity to catch a huge variety of fish, come to Destin Florida and look no further. Below, you'll find a directory of the different species you can expect to encounter in our beautiful waters. Along with each listing, you'll see the most current regulations for each species. Book a deep sea fishing or bay fishing trip in Destin today, and see for yourself why we're truly "The Worlds' Luckiest Fishing VIlliage".  

Red Snapper

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 14; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8 - 9. Scale rows on back rising obliquely above lateral line. Specimens under 30 to 35 cm with large dark spot on the upper sides, located below the anterior soft dorsal rays.


Adults are found over rocky bottoms. Juveniles inhabit shallow waters, common over sand or muddy bottoms. Feed mainly on fishes, shrimps, crabs, worms, cephalopods, and some planktonic items including urochordates and gastropods. Marketed fresh and eaten steamed, broiled and baked. Heavily exploited in American waters where it is now closely protected; shrimp fishing, accused of destroying young snappers, is currently restricted.

Lutjanus campechanus

Vermillion Snapper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 12 - 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10-11; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Snout short, lower jaw slightly projecting. Mouth small. Pectoral fins relatively short, not reaching level of anus. Scale rows on back rising obliquely above lateral line. Back and upper sides vermilion, shading to silvery with reddish tinge ventrally, with narrow horizontal yellow lines below the lateral line. The dorsal and caudal fins yellowish; the anal and pelvic fins whitish.


Adults are found in moderately deep waters, most common over rock, gravel or sand bottoms near the edge of the continental and island shelves, often in large schools. Young fish occur in shallower depths (below 25 m), also often forming large schools. They feed on fishes, shrimps, crabs, polychaetes, other benthic invertebrates, cephalopods and planktonic organisms. Good food fish

Rhomboplites aurorubens

Lane Snapper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12-13; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8 - 9. Preopercular notch and knob weak. Pectoral fins short, not reaching level of anus. Scale rows on back rising obliquely above lateral line. Back and upper side pink to reddish, with a green tinge and diffused darker vertical bars. The lower sides and belly silvery with a yellow tinge. A series of 8 - 10 horizontal yellow or golden stripes on sides. A diffused black spot mainly above the lateral line and below the anterior portion of the soft dorsal-fin rays.


Adults are found over all types of bottom, but mainly around coral reefs and on vegetated sandy areas. In turbid as well as clear water. They often form large aggregations, especially during the breeding season. Feed at night on small fishes, bottom-living crabs, shrimps, worms, gastropods and cephalopods. Good food fish, it is marketed fresh.

Lutjanus synagris

Mahogany Snapper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 10; Dorsal soft rays (total): 11-12; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Lower jaw projecting slightly beyond upper jaw; lower corner of preopercle greatly projecting and strongly serrated. Preorbital bone broad, maxilla extending nearly to mid-eye level. Preopercular notch and knob moderate. Scale rows on back rising obliquely above lateral line. Back and upper side gray to dark olive grading to silvery ventrally. Usually with a black spot, about eye size, on lateral line below the anterior soft dorsal-fin rays.


Adults inhabit clear shallow waters over rocky bottoms in the vicinity of coral reefs, less frequently in sandy or seagrass areas. They often form large aggregations during the day. They feed at night mainly on small fish, shrimps, crabs and cephalopods.

Lutjanus mahogoni

Lesser Amberjack

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 28-33; Anal soft rays: 17 - 20


Adults are benthopelagic near the coasts. Smaller juveniles epipelagic in oceanic or offshore neritic waters. Adults feed on squids and fishes

Seriola fasciata

Greater Amberjack

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 29-35; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18 - 22. Bluish grey or olivaceous above, silvery white below; amber stripe along midside of body; fins dusky. Second dorsal and anal fins with low anterior lobe. Species of Seriola lack scutes.


Adults found in deep seaward reefs; occasionally entering coastal bays. They feed primarily on fishes such as the bigeye scad, also on invertebrates . Small juveniles associate with floating plants or debris in oceanic and offshore waters. Juveniles form small schools or solitary. Eggs are pelagic . Utilized fresh and frozen; eaten pan-fried, broiled and baked. Reported to cause ciguatera in some areas

Seriola dumerili

Almaco Jack

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 8; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27-33; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 18 - 22.


Adults are benthopelagic in outer reef slopes and offshore banks to 160 m or more. They form small groups. Young often seen around floating objects. They feed mainly on fishes, but also on invertebrates. Eggs are pelagic. Marketed fresh and salted or dried. May cause ciguatera poisoning, particularly in coral reef areas . Uncommon on East Indian reefs but occasionally found in cool upwelling areas of Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia .

Seriola rivoliana

Gag Grouper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 10 - 12. Distinguished by the following characteristics: adult females and juveniles are generally brownish grey with dark vermiculations; camouflage phase has 5 dark brown saddles separated by short white bars below the dorsal fin; large males sometimes display a "black-belly" and "black-back" phase; black-belly phase is mostly pale grey, with faint dark reticulations below soft dorsal fin, belly and ventral part of the body above anal fin black, as are margin of the soft dorsal fin, central rear part of caudal fin and rear margins of pectoral and pelvic fins; depth of body contained 3.0-3.5 times in SL; head length 2.5-2.7 times in SL; convex interorbital area; angle of preopercle produced into a rounded lobe bearing enlarged serrae; posterior nostrils of adults much larger than anterior ones; smooth lateral body scales, except those covering pectoral fin.

 

Juveniles occur in estuaries and seagrass beds; adults are usually found offshore on rocky bottom (rarely to 152 m), occasionally inshore on rocky or grassy bottom. It is the most common grouper on rocky ledges in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Adults are either solitary or in groups of 5 to 50 individuals; feed mainly on fishes, some crabs, shrimps, and cephalopods. Juveniles (less than 20 cm) feed mainly on crustaceans that live in shallow grass beds.

Mycteroperca microlepis

Scamp Grouper

The scamp grouper (Mycteroperca phenax) is a protogynous grouper also known as the brown grouper or abadejo. It is normally found in reef over ledges and high-relief rocky bottoms in the eastern Gulf of Mexico and at low-profile bottoms at depths of 30 to 100 m in North Carolina. Juveniles can be found as far north as Massachusetts in shallow water at jetties and mangrove areas. This species was the most abundant grouper in areas of living Oculina coral formations at depths of 70 to 100m off the east coast of Florida. The scamp grouper apparently moves inshore when bottom temperature falls below 8.6 °C. Commonly, the scamp is about 30 cm long, which makes it a relatively small member of the groupers, but a specimen has been reported at 107 cm.[2]

The fish's overall coloration is a deep tan or chocolate brown, with numerous darker markings that form dots, or lines, or groups of lines.[3]

Mycteroperca phenax

Red Grouper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8 - 10. Color of head and body dark reddish brown, shading to pink or reddish below. Opercle with 3 flat spines, the middle one being the largest. Vertical fins angulate in larger fish. Pelvic fins shorter than pectorals and inserted slightly behind ventral and pectoral-fin base. Bases of soft dorsal and anal fins covered with scales and thick skin. No saddle on caudal peduncle. Interspinous membranes not incised ; head length 2.3-2.5 times in SL; convex interorbital; subangular preopercle, serrae at angle slightly enlarged; straight upper edge of operculum; posterior and anterior nostrils subequal.


Adults occur mainly over rocky and muddy bottoms. Uncommon around coral reefs. Usually rest on the bottom. Juveniles may be found in shallow water, but adults are usually taken from depths of 70-330 m . Feed on a wide variety of fishes and invertebrates. Are protogynous hermaphrodites. Most females transform to males between ages 7 to 14. Susceptible to red tide toxin (Ptychodiscus brevi). Marketed fresh or frozen. The world record for hook and line, 39 lbs., from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Epinephelus morio

Nassau Grouper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 11 - 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-18; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Caudal fin rounded in juveniles. Dorsal fin notched between forward spines; 3rd or 4th spine the longest. Bases of soft dorsal and anal fins covered with scales and thick skin; scales small and greatly overlapping. Ground color tawny in individuals in shallow water, shading to pinkish or red in those from deeper water, sometimes with an orange cast. Can change color pattern in a few minutes from almost white to uniformly dark brown depending on mood. Third and fourth vertical bars branch above lateral line forming a W-shaped mark. Several distinct black spots below and behind eye and a characteristic `tuning-fork shaped stripe on top of head, dividing just behind the orbits.


Occurs from the shoreline to at least 90 m depth. Usually close to caves. Juveniles are common in seagrass beds. Diet comprises mainly of fishes (54%) and crabs (23%) and lesser amounts of other crustaceans and mollusks. It is solitary and mainly diurnal; but may sometimes form schools. Spawns near the new moon with up to 30,000 aggregating at certain spawning sites. The least wary and most friendly of all the groupers. Heavily fished and vulnerable to overfishing, particularly when migrating or aggregating to spawn. The most important commercial grouper in the West Indies. Marketed fresh, mostly between 2 to 10 kg .

Epinephelus striatus

Goliath Grouper

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Distinguished by the following characteristics: brownish yellow, grey or greenish body color; head and dorsal part of body and fins with small black spots; body robust and elongate; body depth contained 2.7-3.4 times in SL; HL 2.3-2.9 in SL; extremely broad head; flat interorbital; rounded preopercle, finely serrate; round nostrils, subequal; maxilla scaly, reaching well past eye; 3-5 rows of subequal teeth on midlateral part of lower jaw; absence of canines at front jaw; further characterized by having opercle with 3 flat spines, middle one the largest. Pelvic fins smaller than the pectorals. Bases of soft dorsal and anal fins covered with scales and thick skin. Juveniles tawny with irregular vertical bands.


A solitary species occurring in shallow, inshore areas. Found on rock, coral, or mud bottoms. Juveniles found in mangrove areas and brackish estuaries. Large adults may be found in estuaries. Adults appear to occupy limited home ranges with little inter-reef movement. Feeds primarily on crustaceans, particularly spiny lobsters as well as turtles and fishes, including stingrays. Territorial near it's refuge cave or wreck where it may show a threat display with open mouth and quivering body. Larger individuals have been known to stalk and attempt to eat divers. Over-fished, primarily by spear fishing. Marketed fresh and salted. Meat is of excellent quality. Important game fish. Reported to reach weights of more than 315 kg

Epinephelus itajara

Black Grouper

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-17; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 11 - 13. Distinguished by the following characteristics: Side body has rectangular dark gray blotches. Outer third of second dorsal, anal and caudal fins black. Edge of preopercle smooth, without pronounced lobe at angle; 17-24 total gill rakers; depth of body 3.3-3.5 times in SL; head length 2.5-2.8 times in SL; evenly rounded preopercle, without distinct notch or lobe at the angle; subequal sizes of anterior and posterior nostrils.


A solitary species inhabiting rocky and coral reefs. Adults feed primarily on fishes; juveniles mainly on crustaceans. Oviparous. A protogynous hermaphrodite. Forms spawning aggregations. Common but difficult to approach. Marketed fresh and its flesh is of excellent quality.

Mycteroperca bonaci

Gray Triggerfish

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-29; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 23 - 26. Tall, with a small mouth and plate like scales. Three faint irregular broad dark bars on body; a narrow pale transverse band on chin; small light blue spots on upper half of body and median fins, and irregular short lines ventrally.

Inhabits bays, harbors, lagoons, and seaward reefs. May drift with young at surface among Sargassum. Usually solitary or in small groups . Feeds on benthic invertebrates like mollusks and crustaceans. Oviparous. Consumed mostly fresh, smoked, and dried salted. The flesh is of excellent quality. Because it is resistant to capture, it proliferates and competes for food with other species.

Balistes capriscus

Cobia

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 7 - 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26-33; Anal spines: 2-3; Anal soft rays: 22 - 28. Head broad and depressed. First dorsal fin with short but strong isolated spines, not connected by a membrane. Caudal fin lunate in adults, upper lobe longer than lower. Back and sides dark brown, with 2 sharply defined narrow silvery bands.


Adults occur in a variety of habitats, over mud, sand and gravel bottoms; over coral reefs, off rocky shores and in mangrove sloughs; inshore around pilings and buoys, and offshore around drifting and stationary objects; occasionally in estuaries. Form small groups and may pursue small pelagic inshore. Feed on crabs, fishes, and squids. Form spawning aggregations during the warm months in the western Atlantic; eggs and larvae planktonic. Caught in small quantities due to its solitary behavior . Good food fish; marketed fresh, smoked, and frozen. Also caught for sport .

Rachycentron canadum

Dolphinfish (Mahi Mahi)

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 58-66; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 25 - 31; Vertebrae: 31. Greatest body depth in adults less than 25% of standard length; tooth patch on tongue small and oval; single dorsal fin extending from above eye almost to caudal fin with 58-66 rays; a concave anal fin extending from anus almost to caudal fin; pectoral fin more than half of head length . Caudal vertebrae usually 18. Mature males posses a prominent bony crest in front of the head. The color is striking with golden hues on the sides, metallic blues and greens on the back and sides, with white and yellow on the underparts. Small specimens have pronounced vertical bars on the sides of the body.

 

Adults are found in open waters but also near the coast. Form schools. Feed on almost all forms of fish and zooplankton; also takes crustaceans and squid. Sexual maturity is reached in 4-5 months (3 for captive fish). Spawn in the open sea and probably approximate to the coast when water temperature rises. Eggs and larvae are pelagic. Attracting devices such as floating bundles of bamboo reeds or cork planks are used to concentrate dolphin fish before the nets are set. Marketed frozen and fresh and is of high value.

Coryphaena hippurus

KIng Mackerel

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 12 - 18; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-18; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 16 - 20; Vertebrae: 41 - 43. Interpelvic process small and bifid. Swim bladder absent. Lateral line abruptly curving downward below second dorsal fin. Intestine with 2 folds and 3 limbs. Adults have no black area on the anterior part of the first dorsal fin. Juveniles with bronze spots in 5 or 6 irregular rows. Body entirely covered with scales.


Often found in outer reef areas. Larvae are encountered in surface waters of 26.3° to 31°C and 26.9 to 35 ppt. Feeds primarily on fishes with smaller quantities of penaeid shrimps and squids. Large schools have been found to migrate over considerable distances along the Atlantic US coast, water temperature permitting. It is an important species for recreational, commercial, and artisanal fisheries throughout its range. Most of the catch is processed into steaks or sold fresh, or sometimes canned and salted. Also prepared smoked and frozen. Potentially ciguatoxic in certain areas. Sometimes called "Kingfish".

Scomberomorus cavalla

Spanish Mackerel

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 17 - 19; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-20; Anal soft rays: 17 - 20; Vertebrae: 51 - 53. Interpelvic process small and bifid. Lateral line gradually curving down toward caudal peduncle. Vertebrae 21-22 precaudal plus 30-31 caudal, total 51-53. Intestine with 2 folds and 3 limbs. Swim bladder absent. Body covered with small scales. First dorsal fin black anteriorly and at distal margin posteriorly. Generally silvery with sides marked with about three rows of round to elliptical dark spots (orange in life).


Migrates in large schools over great distances along the shore. Larvae are found in surface waters between 19.6° and 29.8°C with salinities of 28.3 to 37.4 ppt. Feeds mainly on small fishes (clupeoids and anchovies), few quantities of penaeoid shrimps and cephalopods. Casting, live-bait fishing, jigging, and drift fishing are also employed in capturing this species. Aerial spotting is sometimes used in locating the fish. Marketed fresh, frozen or smoked; eaten pan-fried, broiled and baked.

Scomberomorus maculatus

Tripletail

Biology & Description:Dorsal spines (total): 11 - 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 15-16; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 11 - 12. Adults dark brown or greenish yellow above, silvery grey below; pectorals pale yellow, other fins darker than body; caudal fin with yellow margin. Rounded caudal fin that appear as single 3-lobed fin.


Adult inhabits bays, muddy estuaries and lower reaches of large rivers . A sluggish offshore fish that often floats on its side near the surface in the company of floating objects. Occasionally drifts over reefs. Juvenile may occur in floating Sargassum and mimic a floating leaf. Feeds on benthic crustaceans and small fish. Marketed fresh, frozen, or salted.

Lobotes surinamensis

Ladyfish

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 25-29; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 16 - 19; Vertebrae: 73 - 85. Scales small, more than 100 in lateral line. Gular plate narrow . Silvery overall, with bluish on upper surface. Branchiostegal rays.


Occur in shallow neritic areas, over muddy bottoms. Also found in brackish estuaries and juveniles are common in lagoons and hyper-saline bays. Form large schools close to the shore. Feed mainly on crustaceans and small fishes. Spawn in the open sea. Larval development is represented by profound changes in body form accompanied by 2 periods of length increase, interspaced by a period of length decrease. Noted for their habit of skipping along the surface of the water and for jumping after being hooked. Marketed fresh, salted and frozen but considered a second rate food fish. Rhynchobothrium bulbifer found in the viscera of the adult .

Elops saurus

Sheepshead

Biology & Description: Inhabits bays and estuaries. Freely enters brackish waters; sometimes enters freshwaters. Commonly found around pilings. Caught by anglers from jetties or rocky shores. Feeds mainly on mollusks and crustaceans. An excellent food fish. Marketed fresh and frozen; eaten broiled, microwaved and baked.

Archosargus probatocephalus

Red Porgy

Biology & Description: Dorsal spines (total): 12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 8. Pinkish silver with an indistinct yellow spot on each scale on about upper half of body, these spots giving a yellow-striped effect; a wedge of yellow across interorbital and some yellow on snout and upper lip; dorsal, caudal and pectoral fins pink


Found over rock, rubble, or sand bottoms (young frequently found on seagrass beds and the continental shelf) down to about 250 m depth, often above 150 m. In southwest Brazil found in 160 m depth. Feeds on crustaceans, fishes, and mollusks. Its toxic nature is uncertain. Marketed fresh and frozen.

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Pinfish

What's this item about? WhatBiology & Description: Commonly found on vegetated bottoms, occasionally over rocky bottoms and in mangrove areas. Enters brackish water and even freshwaters. Often forms large aggregations. Feeds mainly on small animals, especially crustaceans, but also takes mollusks, worms and occasionally small fishes that are associated with the grassy habitat. makes it interesting? Write a catchy description to grab your audience's attention...

Lagodon rhomboides

Nurse Shark

Biology & Description:

 

Moderately long barbels, nasoral grooves present but no perinasal grooves, mouth well in front of eyes, spiracles minute, precaudal tail shorter than head and body, dorsal fins broadly rounded (the first much larger than the second and anal fins), caudal fin moderately long, over 1/4 of total length, yellow-brown to grey-brown in color, with or without small dark spots and obscure dorsal saddle markings . Head blunt, mouth inferior, pair of conspicuous barbels between nostrils

 

Found on continental and insular shelves. Solitary and sluggish fish, often encountered lying on the bottom . Nocturnal, feeding on bottom invertebrates such as spiny lobsters, shrimps, crabs, sea urchins, squids, octopi, snails and bivalves, and fishes like catfishes, mullets, puffers and stingrays. Ovoviviparous with 21 to 28 young in a litter . Kept in captivity for researches. May attack humans if they are molested or stepped upon accidentally. Edible, but mainly valued for its hide, which makes extremely tough and durable leather . ommon over shallow sand flats, in channels, and around coral reefs; young may be found among prop roots of red mangroves .

Ginglymostoma cirratum

Shark (Lemon)

Biology & Discription:  Moderately long barbels, nasoral grooves present but no perinasal grooves, mouth well in front of eyes, spiracles minute, precaudal tail shorter than head and body, dorsal fins broadly rounded (the first much larger than the second and anal fins), caudal fin moderately long, over 1/4 of total length, yellow-brown to grey-brown in color, with or without small dark spots and obscure dorsal saddle markings. Head blunt, mouth inferior, pair of conspicuous barbels between nostrils

 

Found on continental and insular shelves. Solitary and sluggish fish, often encountered lying on the bottom . Nocturnal, feeding on bottom invertebrates such as spiny lobsters, shrimps, crabs, sea urchins, squids, octopi, snails and bivalves, and fishes like catfishes, mullets, puffers and stingrays. Ovoviviparous with 21 to 28 young in a litter . Kept in captivity for researches. May attack humans if they are molested or stepped upon accidentally. Edible, but mainly valued for its hide, which makes extremely tough and durable leather . Common over shallow sand flats, in channels, and around coral reefs; young may be found among prop roots of red mangroves.

Negaprion brevirostris

Shark (Bull)

Biology & Description: Carcharhinus leucas is a massive shark with a short, broad and blunt snout, small eyes and triangular saw-edged upper teeth, and lack of interdorsal ridge, characters which are sufficient to distinguish this species


A coastal and freshwater shark inhabiting shallow waters especially in bays, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. It readily penetrates far up rivers and hypersaline bays and littoral lagoons. Capable of covering great distances (up to 180 kilometers in 24 hours), moving between fresh and brackish water at random. Adults often found near estuaries and freshwater inflows to the sea; young enter rivers and may be found hundreds of km from the sea. Feeds on bony fishes, other sharks, rays, mantis shrimps, crabs, squid, sea snails, sea urchins, mammalian carrion, sea turtles, and occasionally garbage. Viviparous . Gives birth to litters of up to 13 young . Size at birth is 56-81 cm TL . Sexual maturity is attained after 10-15 years (at a length between 160-200 centimeters) . Though not commercially important, this species is a good food fish . Utilized fresh, fresh-frozen or smoked for human consumption, fins for soup, hide for leather, liver for oil, and carcass for fishmeal . Very hardy and lives well in captivity . This large shark is potentially dangerous to man , probably the most dangerous species of tropical shark , and it is repeatedly implicated in attacks on humans ; attacks in fresh water are rare

Carcharhinus leucas

Shark (Blacktip)

Biology & Description: A stout shark with a long, narrow, pointed snout, long gill slits and erect, narrow-cusped upper teeth; first dorsal fin high; no interdorsal ridge. Dark grey, ashy blue or dusky bronze on back, belly white or yellowish white; a dark band extending rearward along each side to about over origin of pelvic fin; tips of pelvic fins with a persistent black spot; tips of dorsal fins, pectoral fins, anal, and lower lobe of caudal fin usually black or dusky in young individuals, fading with growth .


An inshore and offshore shark found on or adjacent to continental and insular shelves. Often off river mouths and estuaries, muddy bays, mangrove swamps, lagoons, and coral reef drop-offs . Bottom associated or pelagic . Young common along beaches. Active hunter in midwater . Feeds mainly on pelagic and benthic fishes, also small sharks and rays, cephalopods and crustaceans . Viviparous. Produces litters of one to 10 young . Incriminated in very few attacks but dangerous when provoked . Often taken by shore anglers . Used fresh for human consumption, hides for leather, liver for oil . Parthenogenesis has been observed in a captive female

Carcharhinus limbatus

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